SERVICE DOG ETIQUETTE
SERVICE DOG MANNERS:

When you meet a person with a service dog, please remember that the dog is working.  Don’t do anything to interrupt the service dog while it is performing its tasks.

DO’S AND DON’TS:

DO speak to the person first.
DO NOT aim distracting or rude noises at the dog, eg whistling
DO NOT touch the service dog without asking for, and receiving permission.
DO NOT ask personal questions about the handler’s disability, or otherwise intrude on his or her privacy.
DO NOT be offended if the handler does not wish to chat about the service dog.
DO give way to the service dog and their handler; they are less manoeuvrable than you are.
DO let the handler know if the dog is in the way.

WHAT IF YOU DON’T LIKE DOGS OR ARE AFRAID OF DOGS?

Place yourself away from the service dog.  If you are a business person, discreetly arrange for someone else to wait on the person.  You may ask the person to have the service dog lie down if it does not interfere with its work.

WHAT IF THE SERVICE DOG BARKS, GROWLS, OR OTHERWISE FORGETS ITS MANNERS?

Find out what happened before taking action.  Was the service dog stepped on, poked, asleep and dreaming, performing its job (some alert their recipients to oncoming seizures, panic attacks, by barking once or twice)?  If the dog’s behaviour is disruptive or destructive, you may ask the person to remove it from the premises.

WHAT IF OTHER PEOPLE COMPLAIN ABOUT THE DOG BEING PRESENT?

Explain that the service dog is medically necessary and that the Disability Discrimination Act allows lawful right of public access and accommodation and protects the right of the person to be accompanied by the service dog in public places

Served with 8/9 RAR, Scott deployed to both East Timor and Afghanistan where in 2012 he sustained an injury and was medically discharged in 2013 being diagnosed with Major Depression, PTSD and debilitating back and neck injuries.  After the death of his assistance dog Whiskey (pictured day before he passed away) Scott was deeply devasted. In an effort to support and assist in Scott's rehabilitation close family and friends gave Scott the encouragement he needed knowing that he was more than able to help and support others through his experiences, knowledge and empathy.

Our founder k. SCOTT JACKMAN (JACKO)

Dogs Saving Soldiers Lives

WHISKEY'S WISH INC

WHAT IS A SERVICE DOG?

Service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability. All our Service Dogs are trained as assistance dogs with specific tasks trained per dog to their individual recipient ie if a recipient has mobility issues we train the dog to handle these mobility requirements, if a recipient does not have mobility issues it would not be required to be trained for mobility issues etc.

Only dogs can be service animals -- no other species have rights as service animals.

Service dogs must be:

Trained -- Under control, on-leash, and housebroken;
Trained -- to do work or perform tasks that mitigate a disability.

A dog is NOT a service dog:

  • Just because you have a disability. The dog must be trained to do something that is directly related to your disability (for example -- you cannot take your Chihuahua into the grocery store because you have difficulty walking);
  • Because he/she makes you feel good, provides emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship. These are not trained tasks. This is an Emotional Support Dog. Emotional Support Dogs do not have public access rights.
  • Because you have a letter from your doctor stating that you would benefit from having a dog. In order to be a Service Dog, the dog must be trained and appropriate for service work;
  • If he/she is a protection or guard dog. Even if you have PTSD, anxiety, or feel vulnerable because of your disability, service dogs cannot be trained for protection. Service dogs must be quiet, tolerant, and mild-mannered. 


SERVICE DOGS ARE allowed to accompany their person in public places as an accommodation for the person's disability.

The training of Service Dogs takes approximately 1 - 1 and 1/2 years.

At this moment Whiskey's Wish is training dogs for our current recipients for:

Mobility Assistance - teach the dog to open/close doors and drawers, pick up and retrieve dropped items, provide stability while the person is walking, help a person get up from a chair or the ground, etc.

PTSD / Psychiatric Service - teach the dog to stop negative behaviour, lead a person outside if having a panic attack in a crowded place, be a barrier to provide increased personal space for the person, etc.